Young Innovaters


Due to my great experience this past summer working at a start-up company, and taking “Should we Start this Company” this semester, I have established a keen interest in innovation and entrepreneurship. I searched innovation, and came across this link. In the blog, there is a link to an MSN Money article about ten teenage innovators who have started their own business, and have been successful. I thought it was interesting because with the economy in the current state that it is in right now, it’s time to try out new ideas. It’s time to take risks, and find the next big thing. Of course not every idea is going to end up being successful, but you miss all of the shots you don’t take. I enjoyed reading these kids stories because they are the ones that got off the sidelines and followed through with their ideas, and did so successfully.

I found particular interest in Brian Wong’s business venture, Kiip. It is a mobile app rewards network that gives people prizes for certain achievements in mobile gaming. I found this so interesting because last fall I took Corporate Finance with Professor McGoun, and my group followed EA throughout the semester. They are what seem to most as a very successful company, but have not actually been profitable since 2007. They are having a hard time generating revenue in this relatively new marketplace called “casual gaming”, or playing games on your cell phones or tablets. Kiip was able to raise $11 Million to fuel growth. I am excited to see where Kiip goes in the next couple of years because I think it has an interesting place in such a fast-growing marketplace.

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7 responses to “Young Innovaters

  1. I think that entrepreneurship is so important today. I really respect people that take risks and try to reach “far out” goals. I really wish I had the brain and guts to pursue the next big thing, but I don’t. I wonder if today’s society has more or less innovators than in the past. People today have a greater ability to finance their start-ups or inventions, but I also think that people today are too scared to lose money and take risks.

  2. Entrepreneurship is crucial for the state of economy that we are in right now. Although people are trying to watch their money and be careful about what they are investing in, innovation is one of the factors that could help stimulate our lagging economy. These kids are the future of America and should be rewarded for their ideas before the CEO’s of companies that are acting in their own self interest. If the country encouraged more entrepreneurs to find winning ideas, I think that our economy and country would be in much better shape.

  3. I have also established an interest in entrepreneurship after investing in a start up company started by a Bucknell student. Also taking “Should We Start This company,” makes me want to try something myself. Your quote, “of course not every idea is going to end up being successful, but you miss all of the shots you don’t take,” is a great message for people who are thinking of starting their own business. You don’t want to be that guy who wished they did something. As long as you take the risk, you will never question yourself on what could have happened?

  4. This blog was an excellent find Jamie and I couldn’t agree more with the previous comments that it really is encouraging to see these kids get the coverage they deserve. It’s fascinating to think that wildly successful companies like Facebook were once the weekend projects of kids like the ones highlighted in the blog you found. The rise of the “casual gamer” is an interesting trend that I think you are going to see take off as more and more people across the world gain access to smart phones/tablets and get hooked playing the addicting app games that have become so commonplace and well known over the past few years.

  5. James, this blog seems to be a great one for you to follow. I think it is very important for aspiring venture capitalists/entrepreneurs to be able to interact with each other, generate ideas, and look back an analyze previous companies that had similar beginnings. I think this is a great blog, because I have always wanted to start a company/be an entrepreneur, but in layman’s terms, I never had the balls to pull the trigger. I want to be in a high risk career like finance, but I want some sort of stability and being an entrepreneur doesn’t do that for me. What kind of businesses are you thinking about starting?

  6. This was a really fun article to read and I’m glad you found that link through WordPress! The idea of Kiip is great, and I particularly liked Wong’s advice to companies to “Generate serendipity…You actually have the ability to create your own luck, and most of us don’t realize this. Don’t wait around for things to happen. Seize every opportunity.”
    I found this to be fantastic advice for a start up company but also quite motivational for all of us.

  7. This seems like a really cool blog to follow, especially for young people trying to start their own business projects. One of the best way to learn about these things is from example, and blogs like this where people can share ideas of innovation, and entrepreneurship are great outlets for that kind of creativity. Furthermore, with technology being what it is today, starting businesses for people our age is a very different process than it has been in the past, and thus people like these are more relevant for us to learn from. Finally, its always inspiring to see young entrepreneurs with successful ventures since they are in relatively the same position as us, which makes us realize how possible it is to accomplish our own aspirations.

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