This Liar, a CEO?


Like I always do when I brainstorm what to blog about, I browsed the articles posted in the blog post assignment. The article about the top 10 CEO scandals really caught my eye this week. Many of them, such as the Enron scandal and the BP scandal, were no surprise to me, as I had been aware of the controversies. The scandal that took me by surprise the RadioShack scandal. In 2006, David Edmondson, resigned from being the CEO of RadioShack because he was caught lying in his resume. He claimed he graduated from Pacific Coast Baptist College in California with degrees in psychology and theology. It turned out that not only did Pacific Coast Baptist College not offer a degree in psychology, but it was proven that Edmondson only attended Pacific Coast Baptist College for two semesters.

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I was extremely surprised to hear about this story. I find it absolutely unbelievable that he had the nerve to put such a lie on such an important document. I also find it unbelievable that the CEO of such a successful company was able to get away with this lie for so long. I find it incredible that no one in the RadioShack organization would take the time to research that the psychology degree even exists at Pacific Coast Baptist College, never mind that he only attended the school for two semesters.

Being a senior in college, with my career and my first job being on my mind every day, my resume is something I think about and work on often. Making yourself seem as impressive as possible to potential employers is something that everyone does, and to know that a successful CEO wrote such untrue things about himself is unbelievable. Something else to consider about this situation is to think about the corporate structure of RadioShack during the time when Edmondson was the CEO. I’m sure everyone working below Edmondson looks back and is ashamed they listened to such a dishonest person.

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4 responses to “This Liar, a CEO?

  1. Falsifying a resume is definitely not the kind of scandal I would associate with a CEO. It is crazy to think that he got away with his lie for so long. It seems like this CEO caught a lucky break throughout his career given that no one ever stopped and checked his background. It is astounding to me that someone who holds a CEO title wouldn’t even think to do a quick Google search to find an actual major at the school he claimed to have graduated from.

  2. Reading this post made me want to do a little research on David Edmondson. I know he lied on his resume but the man has proven to be a very good business man. He did attend Harvard business school and graduated from the advanced management program. He also became CEO of a company he founded called E-Recycling Corps. In 1996, he was voted one of the top 100 marketers in the country by Advertising Age and he also helped in leveraging the tag line, “You’ve Got Questions…We’ve Got Answers.” I know he lied on his resume but I don’t think he should be remembered for this.

  3. I also read about this scandal from the link provided in the blog post assignment. It is so scary to think that other people might get away with this type of dishonesty. As I am applying for jobs, as well, I am constantly supplying alternative documents such as SAT scores and transcripts to verify my accomplishments. I suppose back in the day, they didn’t have any sort of sophisticated system for fact-checking. Regardless, I hope that Edmonson feels extreme guilt and embarrassment for his actions.

  4. I wonder what the rate of resume lying is. Does common advice (or jokes) to “pad” pave the cushy way to outright deceit?

    At what point do people start giving the benefit of the doubt? Once Edmondson is reasonably successful in business, before CEO I mean, people would just infer that of course he went to college. He looks the part, sounds the part, and so on.

    I wonder how this will work for paper 2. Did it affect Radioshack badly? Did he do other things of questionable ethics?

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